The Ancient Library
 

Scanned text contains errors.

On this page: Templum

nor

TEMPLUM. 111. amfhiprostyle, tktrastyle,

TEMPLUM.

IV. peripteral, hexastyle, of the Doric order.

.1 1

.1-1 1 1

1

1 1 1

1

LLL.I.

1

'Ml

1

1 ' i

-ri ^

JT

CZ^

I 1

T

c=:

'\ \\

F"n

i—— ^

-=~

1 1

I. • »ix*i-j»j

1 1

\ i

1 1

I

-rH"

1 !

( 1

! i

1 1

I ;

,

1 1

! i

1

I_J

f~~~^^_ '--'_'_

urn,

s^s^s^msssssassfsssssKm

Vitruvius (iii. 1) says that " the AmpMproslylos has every part which the Prostylos has, and more­over it has columns and a pediment in the posticum after the same manner." This posticum (the Greek opisthodomus) appears to have been of two kinds ; either a mere portico attached to the back wall of the ^ or a larger space, as shown in the figure.

The above plan is that of a Roman Peripteros: to represent the Grecian Peripteros two columns should be added to each side, and the length thus gained thrown into the opisthodomus. In this form there were two columns between the antae termi­nating the projecting walls ; and the three inter-columniatiohs thus formed were fenced with marble railings (plutei, Vitruv. iv. 4), with gates in them giving access to the prodo-mus, as shown by the lines in the figure.

This species of temple was not only more splen­did than the former, but also more fully adapted for the performance of grand religious ceremonies, as the continuous portico all round it would give shel­ter and passage to a large number of people. Ac­cordingly we find that several of the most celebrated Greek temples are of this form ; such as that of Zeus Nemeus between Argos and Corinth, of Con­cord at Agrigentum, of Theseus at Athens, which has no pillars between the antae of the posticum,

4B 2

Pages
About | First | English Index | Classified Index | Latin Index | Greek Index

1106

1107

1108
letter/word  
page #  
Search this site
Google


ancientlibrary.com
WWW
All non-public domain material, including introductions, markup, and OCR © 2005 Tim Spalding.
Ancient Library was developed and hosted by Tim Spalding of Isidore-of-Seville.com.