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On this page: Cognitor – Cognomen – Coheres – Cohors – Colacretae – Collatio Bonorum – Collegatarius

310

iii.

Horum, Filius, Filia.

5.

iv. Horum,

Nepos, Neptis,

6.

COGNATL

vi.

Tritavus,

Tritavia.

6.

1

V.

Atavus,

Atavia. — *

5.

L

9

Abpatruus,

Abavus, Abamita,

Abavia. —

Abavunculus,

Abmaiertera.

4.

e.

JL

iv.

— Propatruus,

Proavua, Proami-ta,

Proavia.—

Proavunexilus

Promatert. —

3.

5.

1

ii.

iii. iv.

— Patruus,

Avusr Atmta," —Horum,

Avia. —

Avunculus, Filius,

Mater. Mag,— Filia.

2.

4. 6.

i.

ii. iii.

— Patrims,

Pater, Amita, " — Propior,

Mater. — Avunculus, Sobrino,

Matertera.— , Sobrinave —

1.

3. 5. ,

|

i, ii. fiL

— Frater, Conso winus — Sobrinus, Soror, Consobrina. Sobrina. 2. 4. 6.

IS EAVE

de cujus eognatione

qua-ritur.

I i

Filius, Filia.

1.

1

Nepqs, Neptis.

2.

ii.

Horurn, Filius, Filia.

3.

iii. Horum,

Nepos,

Neptis,

4.

Horum,

Pronepos,

Preneptis.

5.

I

v.

Horum,

Abnepos,

Abneptis»

6.

Pronepos, Proueptis.

3.

iv.

Abviepos, Abneptts.

4.

I

v.

Adnepos, Adneptis.

5.

vi.

Trinepos, Trineptis.

6.

This table shows all the degrees of cognatio. The degree of relationship of any given person in this stemraa, to the person with respect to whom the r lationship is inquired after (is eatve, &c.), is indicated by the figures attached to the several words. The Roman numerals denote the degree of cognatio in the canon law ; and the Arabic numerals, the degrees in the Roman or Civil law. The latter mode of reckoning is adopted in Eng­land, in ascertaining the persons who are entitled as next o kin to the personal estate of an intestate. In the canon law, the number which expresses the collateral degree is always the greater of the two numbers (when they are different) which express

COLLEGIUM.

the distance of the two parties from the common ancestor ; but in the civil law, the degree of re­ lationship is ascertained by counting from either of the two persons to the other through the common ancestor. All those words on which the same Roman, or the same Arabic, numerals occur, re­ present persons who are in the same degree of cognatio., according to these respective laws, to the person is eave, &c. (Hugo, Lehrbuch, &c. ; Mare- zoll, Lehrbuch, &c.; Dig. 38. tit. 10, De Gradilws, &c. ; Ulpianus, Frag. ed. Booking ; Booking, In- stitutionenS) [G. L.J

COGNITOR. [AcTio.]

COGNOMEN. [nomen.]

COHERES. [heres.]

COHORS. [exercitus.]

COLACRETAE (Koo\aKp4rai9 also called crypercu), the name of very ancient magistrates at Athens, who had the management of all financial matters in the time of the kings. They are said to have derived their name from collecting certain parts of the victims at sacrifices (e/c rov ayeipew ras K&Xas). The legislature of Solon left the Colacretae untouched; but Cleisthenes deprived them of the charge of the finances, which he trans­ferred to the Apodectae, who were established in their stead. [apodectae.] From this time the Colacretae had only to provide for the meals in the Prytaneium, and subsequently 'had likewise to pay the fees to the dicasts, when the practice of paying the dicasts was introduced by Pericles. (Aristopb. Vesp. 693, 724, with Schol..; Etym. M. Phot. He-sych. Suid. Tim.; Ruhnk. ad Tim. Plat. Lex. p. 171 ; Bockh, PuU. Econ. of Athens,}). 173. &c., 2nd ed.)

COLLATIO BONORUM. [bonorum CoL-

LATIO.]

COLLEGATARIUS. [legatum.] COLLE GIUM. The persons who formed a collegium, were called collegae or sodales. The word collegium properly expressed the notion of several persons being united in any office or for any common purpose (Liv. x. 13, 22 ; Tacit. Ann. iii. 31) ; it afterwards came to signify a body of persons, and the-union which bound them together. The collegium was the eraipia of the Greeks.

The notion ^of a collegium was as follows : —-A collegium or corpus, as it was -also called, must consist of three persons at least. (Dig. 50. tit. 16. s. 85.) Persons who legally formed such an asso­ciation were said corpus habere, which is equiva­lent to our phrase of being incorporated ; and in later times they were said to be corporati, and the body was called a corporatio. Those who farmed the public revenues, .mines, or salt works (salinae) might have a corpus. The power of forming such a collegium or socictas (for this term a]so was used), was limited by various leges, senatuscon-sulta, and imperial constitutions. (Dig. 3. tit. 4.) Associations of individuals, who were entitled to have a corpus, could hold property in com­mon ; they could hold it, as the Roman jurists remark, just as the state held property (res com-munes). These collegia had a common chest, and could sue and be sued by their syndicus or actor. That which was due to the collegium or univeisitas (for this was a still more general term), was not due to the individuals of it ; and that which the collegium owed, was not the debt of the individuals. The property of the collegium was liable to be seized and sold for its debts. The collegium or universitas was governed by its own regulations,

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