The Ancient Library
 

Scanned text contains errors.

On this page: Clipeus

CLIPEUS. . CLIPEUS. 297

Climate.

Parallel.

Longest Day.

Latitude.

Passing through

I.

1 2

12h. Om. 12 15

0° 0' 4 15

Taprobane.

11.

3

4

12 30 12 45

8 25 12 30

Sinus Avalites. Adule Sinus.

III.

5 6

13 0 13 15

16 27 20 14

Meroe.

Napata.

IV.

7 8

13 SO 13 45

23 51 27 12

Syene. Ptolemais in Egypt.

V.

9 10

14 0 14 15

.SO 2 33 18

Lower Egypt. Middle of Phoenicia.

VI.

11 12

14 30 14 45

36 0 38 35

llhodus. Smyrna.

VII.

13 14

15 0 15 15

40 56 43 41

Hellespont. Massilia.

VIII.

15 16

15 30 15 45

45 1 46 51

Middle of the Euxine. Sources of the Danube.

IX.

17 18

16 0 16 15

48 32 50 4

--

Mouth of the Borysthenes. Middle of the Pal us Maeotis.

X.

19 20

16 30 16 45

51 40 52 50

Southern Britain. Mouths of the Rhine.

XL

21 22

17 0 17 15

54 30 55 0

Mouths of the Tana'is. The Brigantes in Britain.

xi r.

23 24

. 17 30 17 45

56 0 57 0

Britannia Magna. Caturactonium in Britain.

XIII.

25 26

18 0 18 30

58 0 59 30

South of Britannia Parva. Middle of ditto

XIV.

27 28

19 0 19 30

61 0 62 0

North of ditto Ebudes Insulae.

XV.

29 30

20 0 21 0

63 0 64 30

Thule. Unknown Scythian Tribes.

XVI.

31 32

22 0 23 0

65 30 66 0

Unknown Scythian Tribes.

XVII.

33 34

24 0 1 month about

66° 8' 40" 67° 15'

XVIII.

35 36

g , ____ _

69 30 73 20

XIX.

37 38 39

4 . ___ £ ___

78 20 84 0 90 0

CLIPEUS (ao-Tri's), the large shield worn "by the Greeks and Romans, which was originally of a circular form, and is said to have "been first used by Proetus and Acrisius of Argos (Paus. ii. 25. § 6), and therefore is called clipeus Argolicus (Virg. Aen. iii. 637), and likened to the sun. (Compare also atTTTiSa irdvToo? €ia"i}v, Horn. II. iii. 347, v. 453, cuririSas evicvicXovs, xiv. 428 ; Varr. De Ling. Lat. v. 19, ed. Mtiller ; Festus, s. v.) According to other accounts, however, the Greeks obtained the

shield, as well as the helmet, from the Egyptians (Herod, iv. 180 ; Plat. Tim. p. 24, b.)

The shield used by the Homeric heroes was large enough, to cover the whole man. It was sometimes made of osiers twisted together, called irea, or of wood: the wood or wicker was then covered over with ox hides of several folds deep, and finally bound round the edge with metal. (Horn. II xii. 295.) The outer rim is termed &vrv£ (II. xviii. 479), frvs (Euiv Troad. 1205),

Pages
About | First | English Index | Classified Index | Latin Index | Greek Index

296

297

298
letter/word  
page #  
Search this site
Google


ancientlibrary.com
WWW
All non-public domain material, including introductions, markup, and OCR © 2005 Tim Spalding.
Ancient Library was developed and hosted by Tim Spalding of Isidore-of-Seville.com.