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ACHILLES.

Achilles, as about all the heroes of the Trojan war, the Homeric traditions should "be carefully kept apart from the various additions and embellish­ments with which the gaps of the ancient story have been filled up by later poets and mythogra-phers, not indeed by fabrications of their own, but by adopting those supplementary details, by which oral tradition in the course of centuries had va­riously altered and developed the original kernel of the story, or those accounts which were peculiar only to certain localities,

Homeric story. Achilles was the son of Peleus, king of the Myrmidones in Phthiotis, in Thessaly, and of the Nereid Thetis. (Horn. 11 xx. 206, &c.) From his father's name he is often called TfojAe/S^s1, n^Ar/iac^s, or Hf]\^iwv (Horn. 77. xviii. 316 ; i. 1 ; i. 197 ; Virg. Aen. ii. 263), and from that of his grandfather Aeacus, he derived his name Aea-cides (Ai'a/aSTjs, II, ii. 860 ; Virg. Aen. i. 99). He was educated from his tender childhood by Phoenix, who taught him eloquence and the arts of war, and accompanied him to the Trojan War, and to whom the hero always shewed great at­tachment, (ix. 485, &c.; 438, &c.) In the heal­ing art he was instructed by Cheiron, the centaur. (xi. 832.) His mother Thetis foretold him that his fate was either to gain glory arid die early, or to live a long but inglorious life. (ix. 4109&c.) The hero chose the latter, and took part in the Trojan war, from which he knew that he was not to return. In fifty ships, or according to later traditions, in sixty (Hygin. Fab. 97), he led his hosts of Myrmidones, Hellenes, and Achaeans against Troy. (ii. 681, &c., xvi. 168.) Here the swift-footed Achilles was the great bulwark of the Greeks, and the worthy favourite of Athena and Hera. (i. 195, 208.) Previous to his dispute with Agamemnon, he ravaged the country around Troy, and destroyed twelve towns on the coast and ele­ven in the interior of the country, (ix. 328, &c.) When Agamemnon was obliged to give up Chry-sei's to her father, he threatened to take away Brisei's from Achilles, who surrendered her on the persuasion of Athena, but at the same time refused to take any further part in the war, and shut him­self up in his tent. Zeus, on the entreaty of The­tis, promised that victory should be on the side of the Trojans, until the Achaeans should have ho­noured her son. (i. 26, to the end.) The affairs of the Greeks declined in consequence, and they were at last pressed so hard, that Agamemnon advised them to take to flight, (ix, 17, &c.) But other chiefs opposed this counsel, and an embassy was sent to Achilles, offering him rich presents and the restoration of Brisei's (ix. 119, &c.) ; but in vain. At last, however, he was persuaded by Patroclus, his dearest friend, to allow him to make use of his men, his horses, and his armour, (xvi. 49, &c.) Patroclus was slain, and when this news reached Achilles, he was seized with unspeakable grief. Thetis consoled him, and promised new arms, which were to be made by Hephaestus, and Iris appeared to rouse him from his lamentations, and exhorted him to rescue the body of Patroclus. (xviii. 166, &c.) Achilles now rose, and his thundering voice alone put the Trojans to flight. When his new armour was brought to him, he reconciled himself to Agamemnon, and hur­ried to the field of battle, disdaining to take any drink or food until the death of his friend should be avenged, (xix. 155, &c.) He wound-

ACHILLES.

ed and slew numbers of Trojans (xx. xxi.), and at length met Hector, whom he chased thrice around the walls of the city. He then slew him, tied his body to his chariot, and dragged him to the ships of the Greeks, (xxii.) After this, he burnt the body of Patroclus, together with twelve young captive Trojans, who were sacrificed to ap­pease the spirit of his friend ; and subsequently gave up the body of Hector to Priam, who came in person to beg for it. (xxiii. xxiv.) Achilles himself fell in the battle at the Scaean gate, before Troy was taken. His death itself does not occur in the Iliad, but it is alluded to in a few passages. (xxii. 358, &c., xxi. 278, &c.) It is expressly mentioned in the Odyssey (xxiv. 36, &c.), where it is said that his fall—his conqueror is not men­tioned—was lamented by gods and men, that his remains together with those of Patroclus were bu­ried in a golden urn which Dionysus had given as a present to Thetis, and were deposited in a place on the coast of- the Hellespont, where a mound was raised over them. Achilles is the principal hero of the Iliad, and the poet dwells upon the delineation of his character with love and admira­tion, feeling's in which his readers cannot but sym­pathise with him. Achilles is the handsomest and bravest of all the Greeks ; he is aifectionate towards his mother and his friends, formidable in battles, which are his delight; open-hearted and without fear, and at the same time susceptible to the gentle and quiet joys of home. His greatest passion is ambition, and when his sense of honour is hurt, he is unrelenting in his revenge and anger, but withal submits obediently to the will of the gods. Later traditions. These chiefly consist in ac­counts which fill up the history of his youth and death. His mother wishing to make her son im­mortal, is said to have concealed him by night in fire, in order to destroy the mortal parts he had inherited from his father, and by day she anointed him with ambrosia. But Peleus one night disco­vered his child in the fire, and cried out in terror. Thetis left her son and fled, and Peleus entrusted him to Cheiron, who educated and instructed him in the arts of riding, hunting, and playing the phorminx, and also changed his original name, Ligyron, i. e. the " whining," into Achilles. (Pind. Nem. iii. 51, &c.; Orph. Argon. 395 ; Apollon. Rhod. iv. 813 ; Stat. Achil. i. 269, &c.; Apollod. iii. 13. § 6, &c.) Cheiron fed his pupil with the hearts of lions and the marrow of bears. Accord­ing to other accounts, Thetis endeavoured to make Achilles immortal by dipping him in the rive;: Styx, and succeeded with the exception of the an­kles, by which she held him (Fulgent. Myiliol. iii. 7; Stat. Acliill. i. 269), while others again state that she put him in boiling water to test his im­mortality, and that he was found immortal except at the ankles. From his sixth year he fought with lions and bears, and caught stags without dogs or nets. The muse Calliope gave him the power of singing to cheer his friends at banquets. (Philostr. Her. xix. 2.) When he had reached the age of nine, Calchas declared that Troy could not be taken without his aid, and Thetis knowing that this war would be fatal to him, disguised him as a maiden, and introduced him among the daughters of Lycomedes of Scyros, where he was called by the name of Pyrrha on account of his golden locks. But his real character did not remain concealed long, for one of his companions, DeVdameia9 became

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