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On this page: Tormenta – Tower of the Winds

647

TORMENTA——TOWER OF THE WINDS.

sprays of oak-leavea and fes­toons of flowers with winged figures among them (fig. 8). Lastly, in the British Museum we have specimens of Phoe­nician art, ascribed to the 8th century b.c., in the gold jewellery from Camlrus in Rhodes. In the same museum " the Melos necklace, and the sceptre from the tomb at Tarentum, are admirable specimens of that fine com­bination of filagree and vitreous enamels which characterizes the Greek gold­smith's art in the middle of the 4th century b.c., and the bracelet and ear-rings from Capua, ornamented with lions' heads, are still more precious, as examples of repoussi work in its per­fection " (Newton's Essays, p. 393).

Authorities. Brunn, Gr. Kilnstler, ii 397-412; Mar-quardt, Das Privatleben der RSmer, pp. 669-7182; Saglio, article on Coelatura in Darem-berg and Saglio's Diet, den Antiquitds; and Bliimner's Technologic, vol. iv, pp. 228-413. Cp. the short sketch in the last chapter of Col-lignon's Manual of Greek Archaeology.] [J. E. S.]

Torment&. The heavy Roman engines of war. (See artillery.)

Tower of the Winds. An interesting example of the later Attic architecture, still standing in Athens. It was built by AndrSnicus Cyr-rhestea [Vitruvius, i 6 § 4] about the middle of the 1st century b.c., and it served at once as the public clock and weather-cock of Athens. It is an octagonal tower of marble, with prominent porches, each supported by two simple Corinthian columns, on the north-east and north-west. On the south it has a kind of turret, to contain the cistern for the water-clock. The eight sides

(7) * GL4SS CUP WITH OPEN REPOUSSE WOEK IN SILTEK.

(St. Petersburg, Hermitage Museum.)

(8) * GOLDEN CROWN, FROM ARMENTO. (Munich, Antiquanuiii.)

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