The Ancient Library
 

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On this page: Sculpture (continued)

663

SCULPTURE.

and ivory, was much advanced by two famous " pupils of Daedalus," DlpffiNUS and scyllis of Crete, who were working

(1) * PERSEL'S CUTT1NO OFF THE HEAD UF MEDUSA. Metope from Seliuus (Museum, Palermo).

(8) * THE HAKPY MONUMENT AT XANTHUS.

in Argos and Slcyon about 550 B.C. [Pliny,

(2) * APOLLO or TENEA.

(Munich, Glyptnthek.)

xxxvi §§ 9, 14; Pausanias, ii 15 § 1, 22 § 5], and founded an influential school of art in the Peloponnesus. [This school included Hegylus and Theo-cles (Pausanias, vi 19 § 8, 17 § 2); Don-tas and Dorycleidas (#>., vi 19 § 12, v 17 § 1); Clearchus of Rhegium (iii 17 § 6); Tectseus and Augellon (ii 32 § 5, ix 35 § 3).] Among their works are re­corded not only statues of gods, but also of heroes, often united in large groups. Some con­ception of the ar­tistic productions of this period may be formed from scat­tered monuments still extant, origi­nating in different parts of the Greek world ; e.g. the rude and more primitive metopes of SSlinus in Sicily (fig. 1); the statues of Apollo from the island of Thera and from Tenea, near Corinth (fig. 2); the reliefs on the Harpy Monument from the acropolis of Xanthus in Lycia (figs. 3 and 4), etc. These works, in spite of their archaic stiffness, show an effort after individual and natural expression, though the position of the foot in striding, with the sole completely touching the ground, and the unemotional and stony smile on the mask-like face, are common to all. Even after Greek sculpture had mastered the representation of the human body, not

(4) * RELIEF FROM THE HAHPY MONUMENT. (British Museum.)

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