The Ancient Library
 

Scanned text contains errors.

On this page: House (continued)

310

HOUSE.

parted were hung on the wall. Gradually it became the fashion to attach small rooms

12) PLAN OF THE CASA DE1 CAPITEI.Ll

FIGURATI, POMPEM. a, a, Store-room and servants' room. b, b, Flight of sreps. c, c, Reception rooms. (i, Porter'«lodpe. e, 6, e, c. Day rooma.

(8) xr«/

THROUGH

'M IN THE HOUSE OF PANSA, POMPEII (LOOKING INTO THE TABLIKPM AND PBRlSTrLIUu] \ RESTORED.

of two wings; but sometimes, if the entrance was a wide one, of several folds

This was

originally a wooden shed, which was open

to the two sides as far as the hearth. These rooms had no light except that obtained from the atrium. But the space at the back was left quite free, and extended in its full width in two wings (alee) behind these side chambers on right and left. In aristocratic houses the busts of the ancestors were set up in these wings. The marriage-bed was also removed from the wall against which it stood; the wall was broken through, and the tablinum erected against it

at the back in summer, but closed in winter by a partition. The tablinum was used aa the master's office. In later times a garden, surrounded by side buildings and covered colonnades, was added at the back of the house. This was called pgristylium, and was, as the name and the whole plan of it shows, an imitation of the Greek arrange­ment. The dining rooms, sleeping apart­ments, and living rooms (triclinium, cuKcu-lum, diceta) were transferred into the side buildings, as were also the entertaining room (exldra) and the hall (cecus), and above all the storerooms, hearth, and kitchen. The private chapel (sacrdrlum or Idrarium, see lares) was also generally situated in the peristylium. The entrance into this from the atrium was through corridors (fauces) situated near the tablinum. The atrium now served merely as a state reception-room. It was splendidly decorated with pillars and other ornaments, and had a table (cmiibulum) in the middle to repre­sent the hearth. If the roof was simply supported on beams, the atrium was called tuscanlcum (fig. 3); if the compluvium was supported on four columns, tetrastylum; if the roof-beams were let into the wall on one side, and supported on a column apiece on the other, it was styled cSrinthlum.

Great houses, like temples and large tombs, generally had a kind of entrance-hall or vestlbulum [ve, stdbulum, or an out­side standing-place], raised above the street and approached by steps. This space was often adorned with arms taken in war, statues, colonnades, and flower-beds. It was here that visitors assembled for morn­ing calls. In ordinary houses there was either no vestibulum or only an indication of one, effected by throwing the door a few steps back into the house. The door opened outwards, and generally consisted

Pages
About | First | Index

309

310

311
letter/word  
page #  
Search this site
Google


ancientlibrary.com
WWW
All non-public domain material, including introductions, markup, and OCR © 2005 Tim Spalding.