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On this page: Batrachomyomachia – Baucis – Beds

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BATRACHOMYOMACHIA——BEDS.

The Romans were so fond of the bath that if the em­peror or a rich citizen pre­sented the people with a free bath for a day, a longer period, or in perpetuity, he won the credit of exceptional liberality. It was not un­common for a person to leave a sum of money in his will for defraying the costs of bathing. Some towns applied their public funds for this purpose.

The accompanying cuts give the ground-plan of the hot baths at Pompeii, and of a private Roman bath found at Caerwent (Venta Silu-rum) in South Wales. (For a restoration of the Baths of Caracalla, see architec­ture, fig. 13.)

a, o, a. Women's Bath.

b, b. Men's Bath.

c, c, c. Colonnade.

d, d, d, d, d. Single Baths.

e, e. Entrance to Women'8

f. Side Entrance.

g, g. Waiting Rooms. h, h. h. Shops. i. Chief Entrance. k, fc. Heating Apparatus. I. Porticos.

FLAN OF THE PUBLIC THEUM.£, POMPEII.

o. Entrance. b,b. Pipes, c. Warm Bath.

d. Furnace-room.

e. Stove.

/. Cold Bath.

boman 1'kivatb baths, caerwent (venta silurum, monmouthshire).

(0. Morgan, Arclioeologia, xxvi 2, p. 432, pi. 36.)

Batrach6my6machla. The Battle of the Frogs and the Mice. This was the title of an epic poem falsely bearing the name of Homer. It was a parody of the Iliad, and was probably written by Pigres. (See homer 1, end.)

Baucis. See philemon 2.

Beds (Gk. klrnc, Lat. lectus). The Greek and Latin words were applied not only to beds in the proper sense of the

(3) Stackelberg, Grf&er d. Hellenen, Taf. xxvi.

(2) Micali, Monumenti Inediti, tav. zziii.

(4) Lenormant et De Witte, Monwm. eiramogr. H pi. xxxiii A.

BEI>RTEADS, FROM GREEK VASES.

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