The Ancient Library
 

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138 VARIETIES OF OLIGARCHY. [CH. IV.

were not, so far as we can judge, mere organs of govern­ment: they composed the whole body to whom active political duties were allowed in the particular states. They were 'the assemblies' and not 'the councils,' and all outside the prescribed number, whether rich or poor, noble or base born, were equally excluded from privilege2".

28 This is implied in the definition of Aristotle as well as in the par­ticular descriptions. Thus The Thousand are called at Opus jr\?j0a, at Acragas affpMff/ut; at Ehegium ' they control all things'; at Cyme ^ ro\iTela is entrusted to them. At Heraclea y 6\iyapxta...cl! t£a.KO(riovs y\ffev. The term awiSfnav which seems to be specially used of these bodies (lamblichus, Diodorus and Strabo I.e.) is used elsewhere for the assembly of citizens. Diod. xvi. 65 (of Corinth): Harp. i.v. pvploi. More­over a council of 600 or 1000 members would be out of place in an oligarchy.

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