The Ancient Library
 
This book contains Greek and English on facing pages.

Scanned text contains errors.

T

BOOK II

had imposed on the neck of Taurus the yoke of bondage, and bound it with the strong chains of victory. He was the man who was a light to all and the father of the noble race of the Emperor Anastasius. This my excellent Emperor showed to all, himself vanquishing by his arms the inhabitants of Isauria.1

Homer

A second Homer stood there, not I think the prince of epic song, the divine son of fair-flowing Meles, but one who by the shore of Thrace was the son of the famous Byzantine Moero, her whom the Muses nurtured and made skilful while yet a child in heroic verse. He himself practised the tragic art, adorning by his verses his city Byzantium.

Virgil

and he stood forth—the clear-voiced swan dear to the Italians, Virgil breathing eloquence, whom his native Echo of Tiber nourished to be another Homer.

1 Who had been formerly overcome by Pompey.

Pages
About | Preface | Book 1 | Bk. 2 | Bk. 3 | Bk. 4 | Bk. 5 | Bk. 6 | General Index | Author Index

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